Dog training

Dog training service, mindfulness-related shop opened in Summit County

Monique Guimond and Mikhaila Hobbs are expanding their Steamboat Springs-based business, Dogma Canine Training, to Frisco.
Dogma dog training/courtesy photo

Two companies, Dogma Canine Training and Bhava Yoga, recently decided to expand their offerings in Summit County, offering dog training services and another boutique in towns across the region.

Dogma Canine got its start in Steamboat Springs nearly two years ago in hopes of providing a holistic approach to dog training. In May, the company plans to expand to Frisco, where it will offer group dog training classes to pet owners across the county.

Owner Mikhaila Hobbs said she and her business partner realized there was a lack of dog training services in Summit County during the pandemic. Hobbs contacted a mentor who trained dogs in the area and was able to build a network of contacts from there.



Dogma will begin in May with its group training classes, but Hobbs hopes to expand beyond that once Dogma has the capacity to hire more trainers. Group lessons last six weeks and are open to dogs at least 4 months old.

Dogma’s trainers are all certified and focus on getting to the root of the issues so pets and their owners have a foundation of new behaviors to build on.



“We examine each dog and get to know them and the client well,” Hobbs said.

Hobbs said local Dogma dog trainers have gone through a certification process, including obtaining a license through the Professional Dog Trainers Certification Council.

“We have a lot of education behind us,” Hobbs said. “Compared to non-certified trainers, we just have a little more to offer when it comes to our training.”

Dogma’s group classes cost $350 per session. Those interested in participating can register by visiting DogmaCanineTraining.com. Hobbs said the company is also looking to hire a certified trainer in the Frisco area. Interested trainers can contact [email protected].

As with Hobbs, Jennie Frank found herself wanting to expand her business, Bhava Yoga, during the pandemic. Last fall, Frank added a boutique to the yoga studio space at Main Street Station in Breckenridge.

At first, the Bhava shop was a way to generate more income when traditional yoga classes were difficult to organize due to COVID-19 restrictions. However, Frank quickly realized that she had a passion for selling clothes that went beyond leggings and sports bras.

The yoga studio owner recently remodeled her space to turn the lobby into a full-fledged boutique, focusing primarily on contemporary women’s clothing. The store also sells other items like journals, candles, and apothecary products, all centered around the theme of mindfulness.

“Because it’s attached to a studio — studio is the original brand — we tried to integrate it into the store a bit,” Frank said. “It’s about feeling good inside and out.”

Originally focusing her business on yoga, Frank said she was surprised at how much she loved fashion and selling women’s clothing. That passion and her women-focused clothes help her stand out from the big box stores, she said.

“It’s a creative endeavor for me. I really like organizing and choosing clothes and things that I think will sell well,” she said. “It’s fulfilling in a whole different way. manner.”

Frank said she hopes to expand her store even further and expand her online site, ShopBhavaBoutique.com. The store, 505 S. Main St. in Breckenridge, is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.